>I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.

>I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.
I will not go out faster than 8:30 on Saturday.

In case you can’t tell, my goal is to start out running no faster than an 8:30 pace tomorrow at Bull Run. The past two 50Ks I’ve run – although successful – I did not start out as slow as I wanted, and by the end I felt it. For WS, I need to train myself to start slower and run even splits. I have a feeling that if I learn to do this, I’ll actually bring my race times down quite a bit. Unfortunately the learning curve has been a little rough so far. Knowing tomorrow may hit the low 80’s where I’m running though is a big help. I know that people will start out fast (the first 17 miles are relatively flat). By the time the sun comes up and the heat hits people many will already be hurting from starting fast. I am not trying to “race” this event for several reasons. However, I know that if I keep it slow and steady I have a good shot for a top 10 female which is my goal.

Published by Alyssa Godesky

Alyssa is a professional triathlete who has logged over 8,000 miles in competition of swimming, biking and running across five continents. She came to triathlon from an ultrarunning background and over the last few years has found success back on the trails: in 2018 she set the female supported Fastest Known Time (FKT) on Vermont's 273 mile Long Trail in 5 days, 2 hours and 37 minutes. In 2020 she set the women's supported FKT for climbing the 46 High Peaks in the Adirondacks in 3 days, 16 hours and 16 minutes. She is a triathlon and running coach, and also enjoys spending time guiding hikers out on the trails. Alyssa is based in Charlottesville, VA with her dog Ramona.

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